Is Donald Trump Really Serious About Entering The Presidential Race?

Labor Day in America marks the moment when the presidential campaign turns serious. As summer ends and the leaves start to fall with the weather getting colder every day, the political stakes increase for the presidential hopefuls. Negative ads will start to fill the airwaves and candidates will no longer enjoy the luxury of a weekend relaxation because all thoughts will be on the political campaign.

Many view the entry of billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump into the presidential race as entertainment rather than a political milestone. Since 1988, Trump has flirted on and off with his presidential bid so that only a few seriously believe his entry in the presidential race. Trump has always portrayed himself as a political juggernaut who has built an unlikely coalition that includes white nationalists and Reagan Democrats while establishing himself as a Republican frontrunner.

Trump has made so many controversial remarks and most of the remarks would have ended a political career. Instead, Trump is building up real political organizations in early states that include New Hampshire and Iowa with his lead in the polls getting stronger.

On the other hand, Hilary Clinton remains to be the overwhelming favorite of the Democrats and she is poised to easily claim the party’s nomination. However, Clinton is plagued by a constant dribble of negative news from the use of her personal email while she was still serving as secretary of state to the threats of a populist insurgency on the left of the Democratic Party.

Iowa’s support for Clinton is dramatically dropping and she is now trailing Vermont senator Bernie Sanders in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire. These weaknesses have provided vice president Joe Biden the opportunity to enter the presidential race if he chooses to do so. While Hilary Clinton remains to be favorite Democrat standard bearer for the presidential elections in November 2016, it is no longer a sure thing.

Both Republican and Democrat primary voters have chosen outsiders instead of veteran politicians. Two of the most popular candidates for the GOP nomination are Donald Trump and Ben Carson; two individuals whose names have never appeared in ballots.

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